10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)

1) LinkedIn: 10 Things To Start Every Week, Brian de Haaff

I have always been focused on achievement. I’m a “goals first” guy and I generate lists that help me do my best. A to-do list gives me a sense of control and makes me feel productive when I get work done. Every time I get to cross off a to-do, a little shot of adrenaline is mine. It keeps me motivated and focused on the next job to be done.

2) The New York Times: The Well Guide to Activity Trackers

How much do you move, sleep or do nothing at all? A crop of new activity trackers promises to collect data on your every move and offer new insights about your health.

3) Fast Company: From The Designers of Fitbit, A Digital Tattoo Implanted Under Your Skin, Mark Wilson

For Co.Design’s Wearables Week, NewDealDesign created a concept for a digital tattoo. But they think they can actually build the thing.

4) The Wall Street Journal: Are Workplace Personality Tests Fair?, Lauren Weber and Elizabeth Dwoskin

Workers who apply online at RadioShack must say if they agree with the statement: “Over the course of the day, I can experience many mood changes.” Lowe’s asks job seekers if they “believe that others have good intentions.” A test at McDonald’s said: “If something very bad happens, it takes some time before I feel happy again.”

5) Slate: The Beauty of Bounded Gaps, Jordan Ellenberg

A huge discovery about prime numbers–and what it means for the future of math.

6) NPR: From Kale To Pale Ale, A Love Of Bitter May Be In Your Genes, Allison Aubrey

The word bitter can make some of us wince. In conversation, we talk of “a bitter pill to swallow” or “bittersweet” memories.

7) USA Today: Americans snack differently than other nations, Bruce Horovitz

The snack is nibbling away at how the world eats, drinks and lives.
While Americans snack a bit differently from the rest of the world, with a special penchant for chips, the simple snack — from a candy bar to a piece of fruit to a granola bar — now permeates the globe as it increasingly replaces breakfast, lunch and dinner in households from Houston to Hanoi.

8) Forbes: Texans Created Over A Thousand Local Businesses After Texas Eased Restrictions On Selling Food Made At Home, Nick Sibilla

Texas is enjoying a burst of entrepreneurship after enacting laws that let anyone turn a home kitchen into a business incubator. Under “cottage food” laws, people can sell food baked or cooked at home, like cookies, cakes and jams, if it’s deemed to have a very low chance of causing foodborne illnesses. Crucially, cottage food laws exempt home bakers from having to rent commercial kitchen space.

9) The New York Times: Grilled Cheese? Try a Tartine Recipe Instead, David Tanis

Those old-fashioned neighborhood cafes and bistros in Paris — the sometimes charming, sometimes seriously funky ones that serve a single plat du jour, along with a few salads and sandwiches — are becoming harder and harder to find.

10) The New York Times: Austin City Council Is Primed for an Ideological Shift in November, Bobby Blanchard

In many ways, this city has always been the anti-Texas.
Texas as a state is deeply conservative; Austin is a liberal stronghold. Texas voters have not elected a Democrat to a statewide office in 20 years; Austin has felt much the same about conservative Republicans.

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)

1) The Boston Globe: Presidential history on coffee, Matt Viser

For about as long as we’ve had presidents, we’ve had coffee in the White House. From John Adams drinking coffee to be more patriotic (with that Boston Tea Party and all) to Dwight Eisenhower spending D-Day “drinking endless cups of coffee” to John F. Kennedy’s using “Coffee with the Kennedys” to help win his US Senate seat in Massachusetts, the brew has been an important part of politics. Here’s a look at some notable presidents over the years, and their different coffee-drinking habits.

2) Business Insider: 7 Traits Of Extremely Charismatic Leaders, Jayson Demers

Whether you’re in charge of a multinational corporation or you’re the founder of a small startup business, being a CEO is stressful. You’re the final decision maker and cultural figurehead of your entire enterprise, responsible not only for securing the future profitability and existence of the company but also the respect and satisfaction of your employees.

3) The Atlantic: How to Not Try, James Hamblin

Trying hasn’t gone out of style. It was never in style. Cool is in style, and cool means moving through the world at once effortlessly and effectively.

4) BuzzFeed: 21 Hospital Foods From Around The World, Ailbhe Malone

Travel the world, through your lunch tray.

5) The Economist: Goldilocks nationalism

The size and homogeneity of a country’s population has a big bearing on its economic policies

6) TED Talks: The paradox of choice, Barry Schwartz

Psychologist Barry Schwartz takes aim at a central tenet of western societies: freedom of choice. In Schwartz’s estimation, choice has made us not freer but more paralyzed, not happier but more dissatisfied.

7) The New York Times: Do Workplace Wellness Programs Work? Usually Not, Austin Frakt and Aaron E. Carroll

Most news coverage of the new Kaiser Family Foundation annual survey on employer-sponsored health plans has focused on the fact that growth in premiums in 2013 was as low as it has ever been in the 16 years of the survey. But buried in the details of the report are some interesting insights into how employers think about controlling health care costs. One example is that they’re very fond of workplace wellness programs. This is surprising, because while such programs sound great, research shows they rarely work as advertised.

8) Inc.: You Can Train Yourself to Have More Grit, Jessica Stillman

What’s the most important ingredient for success in life? Talent helps, of course, as do intelligence and happy circumstances. But according to recent, much discussed research by University of Pennsylvania psychologist Angela Duckworth and others, when it comes to accomplishing great things, one factor reigns supreme–grit.

9) Food and Wine: 7 things you didn’t know you could waffle, Dan Shumski

Poor waffle irons tend to get tucked away in the backs of dark cupboards six days a week, only allowed out for Sunday brunch. It’s because the masses scoff at them as single-use appliances. Well, stop scoffing. Waffle irons are capable of much, much more than just waffles. We’re talking steak, potatoes, pizza and beyond. In fact, what I found was that once we ask the question “Will it waffle?”, the answers are practically limitless. Take a look.

10) Facebook: Timeline photo from Humans of New York

“I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet– building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story.”

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)

1) The New York Times: The Economic Price of Colleges’ Failures, David Leonhardt

Four years ago, the sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa dropped a bomb on American higher education. Their groundbreaking book, “Academically Adrift,” found that many students experience “limited or no learning” in college. Today, they released a follow-up study, tracking the same students for two years after graduation, into the workplace, adult relationships and civic life. The results suggest that recent college graduates who are struggling to start careers are being hamstrung by their lack of learning.

2) The Atlantic: Wine and Exercise: A Promising Combination, James Hamblin

Red and white wines showed equal health benefits in new research—among people who move.

3) Business Week: Most Americans Are Single, and They’re Changing the Economy, Allison Schrager

If you are an American, odds are you’re single. According to a new report from economist Edward Yardeni, more than half of Americans aren’t married, up from 37 percent in 1976. He reckons a nation of singletons will change the structure of the economy because it means fewer parents and homeowners. Whether this is good or bad depends: Single people can be more flexible, which means fewer economic distortions and a more dynamic labor market, but it might make the economy as a whole riskier.

4) Elite Daily: 8 Things People With Thick Skin Don’t Bother Caring About, Paul Hudson

1. Your backwards opinion.
Everyone has an opinion, but those with thick skin don’t really care about everybody else’s. This isn’t to say that they believe only their opinion matters. It does mean, however, that, in the end, their opinion is what matters most.
You have an opportunity to show them evidence and change their opinions, but unless you are able to do so, they simply don’t care what your opinion is – no matter how backwards it is.

5) The Washington Times: Joan Rivers, a rare brand of Republican, Michael Taube

The brash New York-born comedian earned her fame and fortune the hard way

6) LinkedIn: Why Managers Don’t Promote Over-Achievers, S. Slade Sundar

Many hard-working Over-Achievers are frustrated with their lack of career advancement. They work long hours, complete mountains of work, but can’t seem to get promoted. The reason? They need to be High-Performers not Over-Achievers.

7) The Wall Street Journal: 10 Takeaways From Pew Global Economic Survey, From Greek Pessimism to Chinese Jubilance, William Mauldin

The outlook for the sluggish global economy can be described as “blah,” but don’t tell that to a bipolar roster of nations with views on their own economies ranging from abject pessimism (think Greece) to an almost religious reverence (China).

8) Thought Catalog: 20 Things People Who Have Climbed From Rock Bottom Will Understand, Valerie Frankel

I’ve always felt that the ever-quoted Maya Angelou said it best: ‘You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.’

9) The Mind Unleashed: 11 Reasons Dehydration Is Making You Sick And Fat

Adverse effects from not drinking enough water include digestive, skin, bladder and kidney problems, fatigue, and even headaches. We need water as much as the air we breathe in! Keeping your body hydrated is not a joke.

10) The Washington Post: What’s the optimal number of times to run for president? Two. Or four., Philip Bump

It’s fun to talk about the prospect of Mitt Romney running for president again, for a variety of reasons. We will grant our colleague Aaron Blake’s assertion that Romney isn’t actually popular enough to win in 2016, at least at this point. But the idea of Romney making a third consecutive run piqued our interest. How’s that worked out in the past?

The political right-side brain v. political left-side brain

A barrage of articles recently came out regarding the different mentalities that Republicans and Democrats have and how our brains – and thus mentalities – are naturally partisan (did you know that we actually use different parts of the brain to think?). The recency of these publications surprise me. Really? Is word about this getting out just now? There are numerous books and academic papers already out there about this. For example, George Lakoff‘s Moral Politics talks all about this and the book came out almost a decade ago, in 1996.

What I’ve observed from past discussions among my GOP and Democratic friends is that Republicans are more “philosophical” in a sense. Republicans tend to stick to policy-making based on principles more so than focusing on numerical data like Democrats do. According to the recent Vox article, “the Republican Party bases itself around philosophical conservatism and the Democratic Party bases itself around policy deliverables.” I also think this is why people call Republicans stubborn and narrow-minded while Democrats are often referred to as softies and too willing to bend. Principles are naturally a more steadfast concept than data — data constantly changes. These differences, however, is also why I think bipartisan compromises are great! It is entirely too hardheaded to base policy solely on principles that are derived only from our own limited experiences, but it is also entirely too unstable to base policy solely on ever-changing numbers that are often inaccurate, skewed, or simply reflective of natural patterns/cycles over time (i.e. China’s one-child policy for population control, which totally threw off mother nature’s rhythm; or maybe you need a little government interference but then back off immediately when things start to seem off-kilter — but this topic is for an entirely different post).

On another note, guess what’s even more fascinating? There are more conservatives than liberals in America, but there are also more Democrats than Republicans. This actually does not surprise me at all. At least from my own experiences, it seems that there are more “conservative”-minded Americans out there who prefer data-based policy-making, or who simply do not like to identify with the GOP (at least not at this point in time due to way too many alienating and totally not PC gaffes as of late – oh, and thanks TP). But then again, I guess I’m biased since I lead a rather conservative lifestyle where I would most likely only encounter people who do the same. Who knows?

Also, let’s go back and take a closer look at how Republicans and Democrats using different parts of the brain and George Lakoff. Apparently, conservatives show more activity in the right amygdala, which aids survival instincts, i.e. “reacting to violations of personal space and controlling social interaction, fear, and aggression.” Liberals, on the other hand, use more of their left insula, which is associated with “self-awareness, social cues, addiction, emotional processing, empathy, and (gasp!) even orgasms.” Having read  Moral Politics, this rings many bells for me. According to the author, Lakoff, conservatives have a Strict Father morality where as liberals have a Nurturant Parent morality. The former emphasizes rewards-and-punishment and children should learn to become self-reliant and self-disciplined. The latter is more about respect and compassion as opposed to obedience – it’s more about exploring life under the protection of parents. Lakoff’s two concepts of morality strike many parallels with the two-party brain system.

All of this being said, I am still flabbergasted that the articles are just now getting out, and only within the last week! I really ought to go back to school so I can write about this stuff and have more credibility (read: degrees = credentials, or so it seems, at least in D.C.).

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)

1) The Daily Texan: In midst of college experience, students shouldn’t forget about the world beyond our borders, Jeremi Suri

Editor’s Note: This is the first of a weekly column on foreign policy from Suri.

2) Forbes: Why Has The Texas Economy Outperformed? A Surprising Answer from Paul Krugman, Bob McTeer

In today’s Dallas Morning News, which is probably a reprint from the New York Times, Krugman’s article opens with ‘being nice to the rich not why Sunbelt is booming.’ Doesn’t it always come down to that old red herring, the rich?

3) Psychology Today: A Giving Spirit in Business and Love Spells Success, Rita Watson

Many of us were raised with the charitable notion that “it is better to give than to receive.” Recently the Biblical concept was tested scientifically to look at the world of givers and takers.

4) The New York Times: A Look Inside the Protein Bar, Cereal Monk

Protein is the hot ingredient of the moment in processed foods, joining the terms organic and low-fat as a major selling point to pitch to health-conscious shoppers. While carbohydrates and many fats are still widely regarded as suspect, protein is being proudly added to products throughout the grocery store, especially the snack aisle, which has made way for a new star: the protein bar. But a closer look shows that its blessings are mixed.

5) Rogers Family Company: Which Is Better For Your Brain? Beer Or Coffee? You’ll Never Guess., Chris Swift

By now most of us know that we can alter the brain with the consumption of certain beverages. Sometimes the altered state is good and can lead to something great (GENIUS IDEA) and some are bad (POOR CHOICES). So when it comes to beer & coffee, which is better for your brain? First let’s learn a little about the brain.

6) LinkedIn: 7 People You Need in Your Life, Dr. Richard Osibanjo

#1- The Sage – This is code word for mentor. Mentors are people who have been where you want to go. They offer you invaluable wisdom and experience that will help you achieve your goals quicker. Mentors can help you expand your horizon. Everyone needs mentors in both their personal and professional lives.

7) Movoto: These Are The 10 Snobbiest Cities in America, Natalie Grigson

When you look up the word “snobby,” you basically get a whole lot of other words that boil down to one primary sentiment: Snobby people think they’re better than you.

8) LinkedIn: Leadership Lessons Begin At Home, Richard Branson

Social situations, educational institutions and the workplace have a great sway on who we are as people, however we most commonly derive inspiration and character-shaping qualities from our home environments – whether we realise it or not. I am most definitely who I am today because of my parents.

9) Thought Catalog: 23 Things Only People Who Love Spending Time Alone Will Understand, Tim Hoch

14. When you do hang out with people, you prefer seeing them one on one or in a small group. The more intimate and deep the conversation, the better.

10) New York Magazine: Pinterest Accidentally Congratulates Single Women on Getting Married, Jessica Roy

Internet companies like to think they know us better than we know ourselves, and in some cases — like the time Target figured out a girl was pregnant before her father did — it’s true. Mostly, though, they fail miserably. Like the time Pinterest sent emails to a bunch of single women congratulating them on being engaged.

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)

1) Fast Company: See How Much Hotter Your City Is Than Anywhere Else, Just Because It’s A City, Jessica Leber

The urban heat island effect makes cities extra hot-and some cities are more extra hot than others.

2) The Economist: The three types of unemployment, C.W.

During the recent downturn, the unemployment rate in America jumped from 4.4% to 10%. Economic growth has since pepped up. But unemployment is nowhere near pre-crisis lows: America’s rate, at 6.2%, is still 40% higher than late 2006. Economists are raising the spectre of “structural” unemployment to explain this puzzle. What is it?

3) The New York Times: The Most Productive People Know Who To Ignore, Gretchen Reynolds

In 12 exercises deploying only body weight, a chair and a wall, it fulfills the latest mandates for high-intensity effort, which essentially combines a long run and a visit to the weight room into about seven minutes of steady discomfort — all of it based on science.

4) Thought Catalog: What Ur Emojis Say About U, Cereal Monk

I don’t always have the right word for things. Actually, I rarely have the right word for things. Sometimes though, there are no words for things. But thankfully, the universe recognizes this problem.

5) Forbes: The Most Successful Leaders Do 15 Things Automatically, Every Day, Glenn Llopis

Leadership is learned behavior that becomes unconscious and automatic over time.

6) The Atlantic: There’s More to Life Than Facial Symmetry, Olga Khazan

A new study finds that possessing a balanced appearance has nothing to do with health, so we can all stop obsessing already.

7) The New York Times: Where We Went, State by State, Robert Gebeloff & Kevin Quealy

Last week, we showed you how domestic migration played out over the last 112 years in 51 charts. The reader response was strong, but many wanted the other side of the picture.

8) Self: Did Someone Say “Boozy Slushies”? Four Ways, Right Here., Paige Depaolis

Well, you’re about to go nuts over these totally delicious boozy slushies. They’re basically snow cones for adults that are a total childhood throwback AND impossible to mess up.

9) Psychology Today: Five Ways Writing Can Make You Braver and Happier, Harriet Lerner, Ph.D.

“You wouldn’t believe how much joy and courage people find when they write about what really matters to them,” my friend Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg told me.

10) LinkedIn: Reference checks are pretty much a waste of time, Karolina M.

Before I get yelled at, note that I said “pretty much”. There are occasions when detailed references are necessary. If you’re hiring someone to perform surgery, do police work, run a university, take care of children etc., due diligence should be done to the absolute fullest extent. For the average job however, I would argue that reference checks are not particularly useful.

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)
 
1) The New York Times: Running 5 Minutes a Day Has Long-Lasting Benefits, Gretchen Reynolds

Running for as little as five minutes a day could significantly lower a person’s risk of dying prematurely, according to a large-scale new study of exercise and mortality.

2) Thought Catalog: 13 Things That Happen When You Date A Coffee Addict, Chrissy Stockton

1. The morning is a bit of a war zone. You love your SO very much, but you also invested in a timed coffee maker because you know they only become their best self after they get a cup of coffee down.

3) Harvard Business Review: The Most Productive People Know Who To Ignore, Ed Batista

A coaching client of mine is managing partner at a very large law firm, and one of the issues we’ve been working on is how to cope more effectively with the intense demands on his time—clients who expect him to be available, firm partners and other employees who want him to address their concerns and resolve disputes, an inbox overflowing with messages from these same (and still other!) people, and an endless to-do list.

4) The Atlantic: The Joys and Sorrows of Late-Night Email, Derek Thompson

For a certain class of workers, nighttime isn’t time off work. It’s time on email.

5) The Toast: Women Listening To Men In Western Art History, Mallory Ortberg

i keep drinking but it’s not making him more interesting

6) Business Insider: What 13 Successful People Do Before Going To Bed, Jacquelyn Smith

Morning routines are important — but bedtime rituals can have a serious impact on your success.

7) The New York Times: Younger Skin Through Exercise, Gretchen Reynolds

Exercise not only appears to keep skin younger, it may also even reverse skin aging in people who start exercising late in life, according to surprising new research.

8) Pew Research Center: Beyond Red vs. Blue: The Political Typology

Even in an increasingly Red vs. Blue nation, the public’s political attitudes and values come in many shades and hues.

9) Forbes: Why Top Talent Leaves: Top 10 Reasons Boiled Down to 1, Erika Andersen

Eric Jackson, a fellow Forbes blogger I follow and find both funny and astute, wrote a really spot-on post last month about why top talent leaves large corporations. He offered ten reasons, all of which I agreed with – and all of which I’ve seen played out again and again, over the course of 25 years of coaching and consulting. The post was wildly popular – over 1.5 million views at this writing.

10) LearnVest: How to Budget Your Money With the 50/20/30 Guideline, Laura Shin

When it comes to money, there’s certainly no shortage of ways for us to spend it—food, rent, retirement accounts, a down payment on a house, gym memberships, gifts … you get the picture.

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)
 

1) People’s Pundit Daily: Was Gov. Rick Perry Indicted As Part Of Political Witch Hunt?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry was indicted late Friday on charges he allegedly abused his veto power, but details of the indictment are leading some to question whether this is all a political witch hunt.

2) Entrepreneur: The Power of Mornings: Why Successful Entrepreneurs Get Up Early, Lisa Evans

When running a business, it may seem like there are never enough hours in the day. Tapping into the power of mornings, a time of day when there are less demands, might be the key to increasing your productivity.

3) Brookings: The Human Importance of the Monkey Selfie, Stuart N. Brotman

Last week’s slow summer news was filled with monkeys and robots, breaking the usual pattern of having sharks grab the headlines each August. The two stories in combination actually raise an interesting and potentially important matter regarding technology development and copyright law.

4) Fast Company: 10 Gmail Plugins That Improve Email Productivity, Stephanie Vozza

Gmail is one of the most popular email services with more than 500 million users, so chances are pretty good that you’re one of them. But are you making the most of your email account?

5) Forbes: Why It’s So Damaging To Tell Women They Can’t Have It All (And Why I’m So Tired Of Hearing It), Kathy Caprino

The latest trend in women’s leadership circles today is telling women they can’t have it all (at the same time), and they should stop trying.

6) Harvard Business Review: Just Thinking You Slept Poorly Can Hurt Your Performance, Kristi Erdal

The study: Colorado College professor Kristi Erdal and psychology student Christina Draganich tricked subjects into believing that the quality of their previous night’s sleep could be determined by measuring their brain waves.

7) Thought Catalog: 17 People On The Healthy Routine That Changed Their Lives, Chelsea Fagan

1. “I started waking up an hour before I needed to get ready, and I didn’t have any specific tasks to accomplish in that time, it just gave me an extra hour to do things slowly and peacefully. I could make a decent breakfast, enjoy my coffee, do a bit of reading, and wake up to the world. I didn’t feel so rushed, and I had a ton more energy every day. -Caitlyn, 23

8) Glitter Guide: Essentials For The Perfect Bar Cart, Caitlin M.

While bar carts are nothing new to the world of home décor, in recent years they’ve become so much more than just a place to store liquor!

9) Dadaviz: Terrorism 1970-present

Illustrated world map of terrorism

10) Lifehack: 20 Signs You’re Succeeding In Life Even If You Don’t Feel You Are, Carol Morgan

We all feel like failures from time to time. While this is a normal feeling, you have to find a way to see yourself and your life from a different perspective.

10×10 Weekly Digest

Welcome to Crystal’s 10×10 Weekly Digest. Inspired by a close friend to spread knowledge and to spark conversations, 10×10 is a weekly email I send out containing 10 articles for 10 friends (the number of friends being more of a guideline than a steadfast rule). My hope is that more of you will start creating your own 10x10s and we can all be a part of this wonderful information-sharing force and make the world a more educated, multi-perspective place. Happy reading!

(Note: The 10x10s I post on my blog are from the previous week’s email to maintain a certain degree of “special-ness” to those I email the digest to directly.)
 

1) The New York Times: Americans Are Bad at Math, but It’s Not Too Late To Fix by Carl Richards

When I lived in Las Vegas, there were billboards everywhere advertising different casinos. One of the most common was the type that promised “98 percent payouts.” I remember thinking how amazing that was. After all, 98 is a lot of percents! It seemed like a really good deal — until I thought about it for a minute.

2) Psychology Today: Developing Your Personal Slogan by Marty Nemko

Creating a personal one-liner can be a low-risk way to improve your life.

3) Cato Institute: Life in Britain on the Eve of the First World War by Marian L. Tupy

The Telegraph has an interesting series of short articles about life in Britain at the start of WWI. While all of the articles are worth reading, here are the best parts for those who like to compare standard of living then and now.

We live in an era in which increasingly, leaders who are authentic, and who translate this into shared value for their people, whether shareholders or stakeholders, employees, customers or constituents, are the ones who have true and lasting impact – ultimately making the world a better place to live in.

5) LinkedIn: Different Perspectives Benefit the Bottom-line by Laura Cox Kaplan

As I climbed a telephone pole to a high wire some 50 feet off the ground, I struggled to suppress my fear of heights. Perched precariously, I held the arm of one of our newly-admitted PwC partners while balancing and inching my feet along the wire to reach for a rope about eight feet beyond my grasp. Below, my fellow partners cheered us on: “Only a few more feet! “Don’t look down.” “Work together!” “You can do this!”

6) Harvard Business Review: If You Want to Lead, Read These 10 Books by Whitney Johnson

Last week, John Coleman posted a list of recommended books, 11 Books Every Young Leader Should Read.

7) Pew Research Center: The Next America by Paul Taylor

Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.

8) Thought Catalog: 11 Awesome Things About Getting Older by Magda Pisarz

1. You are calmer.

 
9) BuzzFeed: 5 Thoughts That Will Make You Rethink Your Entire Existence by Dave Stopera and Lauren Yapalater

1. When you say the word “crisp” it moves from the back of your mouth to the front as you say it.

10) Politico Magazine: The Callow President by Rich Lowry

“Stop just hatin’ all the time.” If you haven’t been following the news, you might not know whether this bon mot was uttered by a character on the ABC Family show “Pretty Little Liars” or by the president of the United States.